Waddow to host Cyclo-Cross event

editorial image

Clitheroe-based Ashton Hoyle Financial Planning Solutions has announced its title sponsorship of the Cycle Sport Pendle Cyclo-Cross event to be held at Waddow Hall this Sunday.

The AshtonHoyle CSP CX as it will be known becomes the third annual cyclo-cross event organised and promoted by Cycle Sport Pendle and this will be the second year it has been held at Waddow Hall.

Additional sponsorship and prizes come from Hope Technology, Physiofusion, Going Dutch and Cheryl King Images. The race forms part of the North West Cyclo Cross Association race series.

Cyclo-Cross is a unique and specialised form of cycle sport, almost always held in the winter months and where competitors face the challenges of riding technically demanding grass and off-road circuits. Senior competitors race for an hour and would expect to have done ten laps of the circuit whilst Women and Veterans (over 40) compete for forty minutes.

A range of age-related junior categories also exist, going all the way down to under-8’s where the course is shortened and some of the more technical sections bypassed. The skills required in Cyclo-Cross make it an ideal introduction to cycle sport for both children and adults with the added benefit of being traffic-free.

Race organiser Mark Turner commented: “CSP is delighted to have the support of AshtonHoyle for the cyclo-cross and we are looking forward to a good event.

“We are expecting in the region of 200 participants young and old, with many drawn by the fabulous venue at Waddow Hall.”

Mark Ashton, Managing Director of Ashton Hoyle, said: “As a company we have pledged a three-year sponsorship agreement with CSP as they grow their membership following British successes at the Olympics and Tour de France.

“The passion and commitment that CSP show to their members is one which we show our clients and we feel that our financial planning skills can be used to service the needs of the growing cycling community. Being associated with the CSP Cyclo-Cross on our doorstep in the Ribble Valley was simply too good an opportunity to miss.”