Yellow flags fly over Pendle in latest fracking protest

Two hundred Quakers from all over Britain took part in a meeting for worship to witness against fracking on the top of Pendle Hill.
Two hundred Quakers from all over Britain took part in a meeting for worship to witness against fracking on the top of Pendle Hill.

Two hundred Quakers from all over Britain took part in a meeting for worship to witness against fracking on the top of Pendle Hill.

Local anti-fracking activists joined in the national Quaker event which centred on 30 minutes of silent worship with yellow, the colour of the anti-fracking movement, visible on coats, hats and rucksacks plus large flags and banners.

Two hundred Quakers meet on the top of Pendle Hill against fracking.

Two hundred Quakers meet on the top of Pendle Hill against fracking.

The day was dry, but cold winds meant that the group needed to brave the elements.

The event was suggested by local Quakers, but supported by Quaker staff from the central offices in London and advertised nationally. Messages of support came from Tavistock, Croydon, Kirby Misterton and Quakers in Essex whilst Quakers in Totness held a parallel event. Those attending the Pendle Hill event included people from Ashburton, Torquay, Sutton, London, Bedford, Cambridge, Birmingham, Market Drayton, Stockport, Manchester, Eccles, Bolton, Huddersfield, Leeds, Hebden Bridge, Lancaster, Kendal, Scotland as well as the Ribble Valley.

One participant said that “it was a wonderful place of calm amidst the flapping banners proclaiming our message”.

Rachel from Chorley added: “It was really important to join with other people who share our values to make a stand: the beautiful surroundings really brought home to me what we are trying to save.”

Quakers meet against fracking on the top of Pendle Hill.

Quakers meet against fracking on the top of Pendle Hill.

Another Quaker, when asked what she made of the event, simply stated: “It was very powerful: it showed me that each one of us can make a difference.”

Quakers nationally have called for ban on fracking and this event was the latest in a range of events designed to draw attention to the campaign.

Ben Dandelion from Clitheroe said: “We are clear that fracking goes against the basic elements of the Quaker faith, that we are to treat everyone equally and with care and dignity.”

If you are keen to get involved, Clitheroe Quakers meet each Sunday in their Meeting House on New Market Street.

Two hundred Quakers from all over Britain took part in a meeting for worship to witness against fracking on the top of Pendle Hill.