Tree-mendous! Valley pupils pick up spades and create new woodland

Pupils plant trees at Sabden Brook
Pupils plant trees at Sabden Brook

Eco-friendly Ribble Valley pupils can proudly show off their green fingers ...after planting more than 100 trees.

The primary schoolchildren from Sabden, Chatburn and Gisburn swapped the classroom for the outdoors and helped to create new woodlands to protect rivers and wildlife in the rural borough.
They planted over 100 trees along the picturesque banks of both Twiston Beck, near to Twiston Mill, and Sabden Brook, downstream of the village.
The youngsters were supported by staff and volunteers from the Ribble Rivers Trust and the Pendle Hill Landscape Partnership, schemes funded by players of the National Lottery and Esme Fairburn Foundation.
These new woodlands, along with others planted this winter, will offer habitats and food for an array of wildlife. The roots will protect the land from erosion and leaves will give much needed shade, that will cool the water for fish and invertebrates over the warm summer months.
By slowing the flow of water in these upland areas, woodlands can also help to reduce the impact, further down the river’s catchment, of heavy rainfall events.
Education and Engagement Officer at the Ribble Rivers Trust, Emily Bateman, said “As well as a fun day out for the children, full of hands-on opportunities to learn through real-life conservation work, we hope that the children enjoy the woodlands that they have created alongside the rest of the community and wildlife that they will benefit well into the future.
“The trees will grow tall as a very visual local reminder of the children’s place within this landscape and the positive influence that they can have on it.”
Alison Cross, PHLP oudoor learning officer, added: “There are 28,617 trees to plant for the four years Pendle Hill Project, so we are looking for other local schools and organisations to help us create new habitats.”

A tall order, but one achieved successfully by everyone involved in planting the trees.

A tall order, but one achieved successfully by everyone involved in planting the trees.