Ribble Valley pals step up to aid Alan’s road to recovery

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It painted the perfect picture of a man with a severe head injury when his Ribble Valley colleagues raised £970 to aid his recovery.

For Alan Brigg had only been working at Spiroflow UK, Clitheroe, for three years when more than 30 people took on a sponsored walk in Grindleton, Waddington and West Bradford.

Sue McIntyre with her partner Alan Brigg before his motorcycle accident. (s)

Sue McIntyre with her partner Alan Brigg before his motorcycle accident. (s)

“Alan is our friend before he is our colleague and we want to do all we can to support him,” said Managing Director James Podevyn.

“He likes a good walk, so this seemed like the perfect activity for Alan to know we are thinking of him.”

Just two years after climbing mountains Sca Fell and Ben Nevis, the 41-year-old was left unable to stand for three months and still cannot walk unaided as the result of a serious motorcycle accident.

“He was part of the Ribble Valley Walking Group so for this to happen is unfair,” said his partner Sue McIntyre.

Employees at Spiroflow UK, Clitheroe, on a sponsored walk raising money to support colleague Alan Brigg's recovery from a motorcycle accident. (s)

Employees at Spiroflow UK, Clitheroe, on a sponsored walk raising money to support colleague Alan Brigg's recovery from a motorcycle accident. (s)

“He still can’t sit up on his own and he has a long way to go to put his long-term memories back in order - they’re like files in a cabinet which have been mixed up. Hopefully over time he’ll be able to lead an independent life.”

Still, Sue is determined to remain positive.

“The walk was a lovely thing to do. It was brilliant and I can’t believe how much was raised. Alan would have been there in a breath.

“His short memory loss is not good but we can now buy him a tablet to download memory games recommended by his occupational therapist and to take photos and videos tracking his physiotherapy sessions, as he gets frustrated because he can never remember having them.

“He’ll also be able to get back in contact with his friends on Facebook and see their well wishes,” she said.

“It’s good for his brain to have some stimulation.”

One thing the accident hasn’t changed, though, is Alan’s brightly glowing spirit.

It’s something that shone through when friends, family, colleagues and even their dogs braved the rain and mud, while the Waddington Arms splashed out on a spread of sandwiches and crisps to refuel them.

“The level of personal generosity within the company is testament to how well Alan is thought of,” James said.

And, as Sue added, to whom the “amazing” support means the world: “Through it all, Alan’s shown his humour. He’s a lovable person who’s easy-going and he still has those traits today - I’m really pleased about that.

“To say he’s someone his workmates have only known for a short time just goes to show what sort of person he is.”