Clitheroe woman launches endometriosis battle

Ceri Jones who is organising a charity event in aid of Endometriosis UK.
Ceri Jones who is organising a charity event in aid of Endometriosis UK.

A devastating illness that’s not widely recognised has vastly reduced 26-year-old Ceri Jones’s chances of ever having children.

Now Ceri has vowed to raise awareness of endometriosis – which affects a woman’s womb – and raise money for the charity Endometriosis UK.

“One woman in 10 suffers from endometriosis to some degree, but many don’t realise it,” said Ceri, of Cringle Way, Clitheroe.

“I’m hoping to make more women aware of it.”

Ceri has organised a fund-raising evening on Saturday, May 9th, at Clitheroe British Legion Club, featuring bingo, a quiz, raffle, games and local DJ Danny Holland.

Tickets are £5 including buffet, available from 07792 008999, and the event starts at 7-30 pm.

Don’t be fobbed off. Endometriosis can be mistaken for irritable bowel syndome or just bad periods. You’ve got to keep insisting

Ceri Jones

Proceeds will be divided between Endometriosis UK and the Cystic Fibrosis Trust, as one of Ceri’s colleagues at Hanson Cement has a child suffering from cystic fibrosis.

Hanson’s have also pledged to match any money she raises, up to £500.

Ceri’s ordeal with endometriosis began some six years ago but was not finally diagnosed until a year ago. It occurs when cells from the lining of the uterus migrate outside it, affecting other organs.

“It began with severe abdominal pains, but no-one knew the cause” said Ceri, a former student at Clitheroe Royal Grammar School sixth form centre.

Ceri says a series of examinations failed to find the cause of her illnesses, and she has undergone surgery six times with a seventh due soon.

“Endometriosis can’t be diagnosed by scanning, only by surgery,” Ceri said.

Eventually, Ceri underwent a drug-induced menopause to ease the symptoms.

“It means my chance of having children in future is very much reduced,” she said.

Partner Steve Hargreaves, a self-employed agricultural contractor, has been with Ceri all the way during her ordeal.

“He’s been my rock. I don’t know what I’d have done without him,” she said.

Endometriosis affects women of child-bearing age and symptoms can include painful periods, pelvic pain, back and leg pain and bowel problems.

It is not cancerous and not infectious but can lead to depression.

Endometriosis UK (www.endometriosis-uk.org) backs research into the condition and supports sufferers and others affected.

Ceri’s advice to other women is: “Don’t be fobbed off. Endometriosis can be mistaken for irritable bowel syndome or just bad periods. You’ve got to keep insisting.”