‘The Right Thing’: play set in post-war Nelson

The cast of the Pendle Borderline Theatre Company production of 'The Right Way' during their dress rehersal at Colne Muni. A240511/6

The cast of the Pendle Borderline Theatre Company production of 'The Right Way' during their dress rehersal at Colne Muni. A240511/6

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A PLAY about Pendle has gone down well with local audiences.

“The Right Thing” was great to watch, with a combination of comedy, tragedy and relationships.

Written by local playwright John Turley, it is based in Nelson in the mid-1940s, at the end of the Second World War.

It is directed for Pendle Borderline Theatre Company by Peter Allen and has a capable cast who make great use of the script. There is singing and dancing as well as comedy.

It’s the story of a soldier returning from the war – after a full six years – to meet his wife. The theme tune is “We’ll Meet Again”, but in the circumstances that is ironic.

The first performance had a pretty packed audience at the Muni in Colne. The play involves real local issues from the mid 20th Century and that includes politics, parsons, Pendle Hill, pubs and picture houses. It also features cotton weaving, the love of the Clarets – and even the Nelson Leader gets a mention!

It can prove real nostalgia for the audience, of course. The characters are realistic and well cast. Michelle Shelton and Nick Allen are the lead couple. Michelle is a powerful figure very well performed. Nick, too, is full of skill and is a realistic personality.

Tony Cummings is also excellent as Alice’s dad Arthur. They are very well backed by Keilli Broome as Vi, Simon Pomfret as Jimmy, Simon Bailey as a Methodist minister, Yvonne Bolton as terrific varied characters, John Cummings as Hargreaves and then Vinnie, and Kevin Kay as comical Charlie.

Completing the line-up are Eddie and Carole Burgess as a couple and Sarah Mallaby as a pub woman. There is a good set and the whole thing works very well. It is scripted with skill by John Turley, who was born in 1946 – around nine months after his dad was de-mobbed! It is entertaining and, at times, very amusing.