Pendle Witches exhibition on display at Clitheroe Library

Waddington artist, Christopher Perkins, will exhibit his work of Pendle Witches in Clitheroe Library. G080512/5
Waddington artist, Christopher Perkins, will exhibit his work of Pendle Witches in Clitheroe Library. G080512/5

It’s as if by magic a legendary story of simple folk living in the shadow of Pendle Hill have become amongst the areas most famous residents.

It’s a story of intrigue, diabolical deeds, treachery and mischief with more than just a touch of mystery and melodrama. It’s a story that has become legendary for 400 years, based around the belief of witchcraft and local witches living in and around the villages of Barley, Higham and Newchurch, the grand old hall at Roughlee, and the almost mythical Malkin Tower, which no one can pinpoint to this day.

Waddington artist, Christopher Perkins is pictured with The Mayor of Ribble Valley, Coun. Simon Hore as they launch the Pendle Witch exhibition at Clitheroe Library. G080512/5b

Waddington artist, Christopher Perkins is pictured with The Mayor of Ribble Valley, Coun. Simon Hore as they launch the Pendle Witch exhibition at Clitheroe Library. G080512/5b

Nestled on the “other side of Pendle Hill” lies Mydas Touch, a studio and gift shop which overlooks Lancashire’s most famous or indeed, infamous hill. The studio based just outside the village of Waddington, at Backridge Farm, is situated en route to that last long fateful walk which Mother Demdike, Old Chattox, and their offspring along with gentlewoman Alice Nutter of Roughlee Hall would take before embarking upon their notorious witchcraft trials at Lancaster Castle in 1612.

To commemorate the 400th anniversary of the Pendle Witches, local artist Christopher Perkins, who owns the one man studio, has created a series of unique souvenirs which are available to buy from the studio’s gift shop.

All the creations are based on the Pendle Witches, but with a fun loving, yet sympathetic depiction of a group of individuals who lived around the rural parts of East Lancashire in the 17th Century.

Christopher’s art works and souvenirs have caused great interest amongst both tourists and the tourism officers and he has been asked to display his work at the Ribble Valley’s libraries on the run-up to the Pendle Witches 400th anniversary in August.

Ribble Valley Mayor Coun. Simon Hore visited Clitheroe Library to launch the Pendle Witch exhibition which will remain at Clitheroe and Longridge libraries throughout May. The display will then move to Chatburn and Whalley libraries, dates to be confirmed.