Sawley kayaker Schofield on winning team

WINNERS: Great Britain's Jon Schofield (left) and Liam Heath celebrate winning bronze in the final of the men's double kayak 200m sprint event at Eton Dorney
WINNERS: Great Britain's Jon Schofield (left) and Liam Heath celebrate winning bronze in the final of the men's double kayak 200m sprint event at Eton Dorney
0
Have your say

THE Olympics may be over, but the dream of London 2012 lives on for Sawley kayaker Jon Schofield.

After scooping a bronze medal in the K2 200m final at Eton Dorney alongside Liam Heath, the 27-year-old felt privileged to be among the athletes that contributed to a record-breaking medal haul.

Team GB finished a historic third in the medal table after a phenomenal fortnight, Britain’s most fruitful finish since the 1908 Games, also held in the country’s capital. Team GB also took nine medals in the rowing events, one of which went to the sprint pairing.

“It was fantastic, an experience of a lifetime,” beamed Schofield, pictured right with Heath. “It was just amazing to be involved in such a phenomenal occasion. I’m glad we made the most of it. We will never forget it.

“To be an Olympian is one thing but to win a medal is incredible. We’d been watching a lot of sport, watching others pick up there medals, so to go on and get a medal of our own was fantastic.

“For me that was one of the biggest things, being able to look at that table and know that we’d contributed to that success.”

In the final, the European champions had looked set for silver as they approached the final few strokes, but were pipped to the line by the fast-finishing Belarus pair, while the Russians took gold.

Schofield just hopes their performance, in a discipline that had never been witnessed at the Games before, left a lasting legacy.

He said: “I really hope that we’ve left some kind of legacy. People turned out to watch the races, they enjoyed it and were engaged in it.”

Now, as the pair take a well-deserved break, the only thing that remains to be decided for Schofield is where to mount his medal.

“I’ve been keeping it within arm’s reach,” he said. “I haven’t really thought about where to put it yet though. I’m sure it will get pride of place in the house.

“It’s a surreal sort of feeling and it could take a while to sink in. It’s been an incredible experience.”