DCSIMG

Small businesses can thrive in their rural locations

Branching out: Lancashires farmers have had to diversify, like Pam Turner and daughter Rachel, who opened a farm shop at their Windy Arbour Farm, in Billinge

Branching out: Lancashires farmers have had to diversify, like Pam Turner and daughter Rachel, who opened a farm shop at their Windy Arbour Farm, in Billinge

The value of England’s rural economy is around a fifth of the national total, and the vast majority of rural businesses are very small.

A report published last year by the Commission for Rural Communities looked at ways in which some micro-businesses in rural areas had managed to thrive, despite the challenging economic conditions.

It identified the following factors behind the continuing success of some rural micro-businesses:

• Many farmers and other small businesses have diversified by letting out accommodation for other businesses to use;

• Small companies, such as food producers or providers of holiday accommodation, have found success by identifying a niche market, either with a rural-focused product, or in a location where that product is currently hard to obtain;

• Successful small, rural shops and other small businesses have often benefited from developing a very deep understanding of the needs of their local market, and adapting to meet them;

• Some businesses offering holiday accommodation or leisure facilities in rural areas, for example, have found ways of packaging their products and selling them to a wider market.

• Some farmers have been able to use an idyllic rural location to market business units in former farm buildings;

• Some small business have found that costs such as rent, rates and parking charges can be lower in rural areas, compared to urban.

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page