Jobs boom on cards at new business park

Simon England of Harrison Drury and James Alpe on the site where the industrial park will be built (s)
Simon England of Harrison Drury and James Alpe on the site where the industrial park will be built (s)

A jobs boom is on the cards in Clitheroe after councillors gave he green light to build the first industrial park in the town for 15 years.

The development on the Salthill Industrial Estate will create 21 units offering a home to new businesses and a chance to re-locate for existing companies.

The 6.8 acre site just off Lincoln Way, had been the Twinbrook Golf driving range since the 1990s, but was acquired by James Alpe in February 2015.

The development will see the creation of industrial units varying in size from 1,000 to 14,000 sq ft, parking spaces, and associated landscaping. New trees will also be planted as part a biodiversity plan for the site which is next door to Ultraframe.

James Alpe said: “This is a good opportunity to bring new high-quality industrial facilities to Clitheroe, which due to its rural location has only limited scope for new commercial development.

“Having both lived and worked in the area all my life it is important to me that Clitheroe continues to thrive and evolve.”

James Alpe is one of the North West’s leading accident repair centres and vehicle conversion specialists. The units will be built in two blocks with 12 units in one and nine in the other. Materials used for the buildings will be in keeping with other units in the area. They would also be “green’’ with solar panels on the roof. James Alpe Developments was advised on the acquisition of the site by the property team at Harrison Drury solicitors, which has an office in Clitheroe.

Simon England, who heads up Harrison Drury’s Clitheroe office, said: “These units will provide much-needed industrial and office space, allowing new businesses to move in and create new jobs, as well as allowing established businesses wanting to stay in the area to expand. This investment will provide a significant economic boost to Clitheroe and the Ribble Valley.”

Concerns had been expressed about the possibility of flooding on the site by local residents but the Environment Agency said it is not a risk.