Barrow teenager treks Yorkshire’s Three Peaks to help Indian village

Faye Regan (15) along with Phil Mahon and Pat Mahon presents Dr Joe Kallarackell with a cheque for �1,380 for homeless people in a remote village in India.
Faye Regan (15) along with Phil Mahon and Pat Mahon presents Dr Joe Kallarackell with a cheque for �1,380 for homeless people in a remote village in India.
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KIND-HEARTED teenager Faye Regan trekked Yorkshire’s Three Peaks to raise badly-needed cash for a remote Indian village.

Faye, aged 15, from Barrow, heard about the grim plight of villagers - their bad sanitation, poverty and lack of health care - when she attended a talk given by Clitheroe couple Phil and Pat Mahon at English Martyrs Church, Whalley, which has a ‘twin’ village in the Indian district of Idukki.

She was moved by the story of one poor family whose house roof was letting in water and about to cave in, and decided to do some fund-raising of her own.

Faye planned to walk the Three Peaks with her father Martin, but unfortunately he broke his foot in an accident, Undeterred, Faye talked her brother Graeme, 32,into accompanying her. They completed the arduous 25-mile challenge in 11 hours 50 mins and raised £550 in sponsorship from friends, family, English Martyrs parishioners and Faye’s schoolmates at St Augustine’s High School, Billington.

This money, together with a further £800 Mr and Mrs Mahon have also raised from friends and family, will be taken out direct to the village by two local doctors who come from this area in India, and who are parishioners of English Martyrs Church. They both speak the local language and will be able to report back as to how the money will be used.

Mr and Mrs Mahon saw at first hand the conditions at the Indian ‘twin’ village at the end of an extended holiday last year to visit friends and family in America, Australia and New Zealand.

After a five-hour journey into the hills of Kerala on chaotic rough roads, in ‘Tuk Tuk’ taxis and overcrowded buses, they managed to find the village Mankuva.

Mr Mahon said: “The people there are very poor and in urgent need of support. Sanitation and housing are poor and disease is rampant. General living conditions are very basic and there is need of financial support for palliative care for cancer sufferers.

“Since hearing of the needs of these poor people, English Martyrs St Vincent de Paul Conference has raised £780 which has been sent to the village to build toilets in 12 homes.

“We’re very pleased with Faye’s effort to help. It was no mean feat. She’s a very special girl - who says that teenagers only think of themselves?”