Gregory's first novel envisions new chapter for society

Gregory James Clark with his previous publications. (s)
Gregory James Clark with his previous publications. (s)

A Clitheroe man is raising a glass to the launch of his first novel - science fiction imagining a revolutionary new world.

Gregory James Clark (55) is translating an inspiring theory into an imaginary utopia in The Island of Dreams, envisioning a society which sparkles with equality.

Gregory James Clark. (s)

Gregory James Clark. (s)

“I’ve always had a desire to write fiction,” he said. “I’m one of those people who want to make the world a better place so my book shows what we could do to bring about change.”

“There are many anti-capitalist protestors out there but they’re not giving us an alternative model. The world deserves action.

“The time has come to ditch Communism as a substitute: it came out of a violent upheaval and people were forced to follow it.”

In Gregory’s novel, 24 year-old Gary Loman receives a prestigious invitation to relocate to the Island of Dreams for the chance of a life without deprivation. Ruled by Queen Katie of Kamchatka, his new home was formed as the basis of a bright new society. But with the revolution taking an ambitious turn, he finds himself entangled “in a society bringing the whole world to the brink of a breath-taking transformation, whose consequences are unforeseeable”.

In contrast, in real life, what is frighteningly clear in the author’s mind is a potentially catastrophic future as a result of capitalism.

“I’m concerned about the impact of nuclear power and technological change - in the wrong hands, it could have disastrous consequences. Other concerns include the dangers of kidnapping to power a black market once we can successfully carry out brain transplants.

“If capitalism continues, we could lose the ability to sustain ourselves. Power is often decided by money - and there are dangerous people in control. Politicians are trained to win elections, not manage systems. In my novel, therefore, governments aren’t elected into power.”

Gregory’s fictional society is informed by the theory, Total Quality Management - devised by philosophers W. Edwards Deming and J. M. Juran - which, he said, was used by Japan to help rebuild the nation in the late 20th Century.

“The book has some wake-up calls. It’s thought-provoking and readers can expect something different.”

But, ultimately, the goal is to inspire and encourage readers to dare to dream.

“After all,” Gregory added, “we all want to be a part of a system in which everyone’s a winner.”

The Island of Dreams is available online at www.amazon.co.uk