Young entrepreneur aims to get new Whalley market on the map

Charlie Bolton from Whalley with his stall Crafty by Charlie at the Samlesbury Hall Easter extravaganza.

Charlie Bolton from Whalley with his stall Crafty by Charlie at the Samlesbury Hall Easter extravaganza.

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A TEENAGE entrepreneur is behind a collaboration to relaunch Whalley Market and create a vibrant local food and craft experience.

Let’s Get Crafty is a food and crafts fair that takes place in the picturesque Ribble Valley village of Whalley. Held each month at Whalley Village Hall, the event is organised by 18-year-old entrepreneur Charles Bolton.

The fair showcases fine food and creative crafts from around Lancashire and the North West. Regular stalls include stunning glassware, cute cupcakes, nifty needlework and delightful handmade bath and body products from Charles’s own company, Crafts by Charlie.

Now in its third month, the response has been so enthusiastic that Charles, who set up his own business when he was just 12 years old, is collaborating with Susan Sanderson and Mandy Richardson of local artisan bread company, The Bread Fairy, to create an all-new Whalley Market. It will take place on the Whalley Arm’s car park on Sunday September 16th from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.

The aim of the organisers is to create an unrivalled food and craft experience in the village that will attract people from all over the region and breathe new life into the market.

On the day there will 35 stalls as well as the 15 plus stalls of fabulous products inside Whalley Village Hall. Breda Murphy, chef extraordinaire and recent winner of The Good Food Guide’s best café in the country accolade, will be officially opening the market with the Mayor and Mayoress of the Ribble Valley in attendance.

Charles said: “Whalley has wide-ranging appeal that attracts many visitors. With its famous views of Whalley Nab, relaxing river walks and the ancient ruins of Whalley Abbey, this is the perfect place to stroll and take time out in the individual boutiques, cafes, restaurants and rural inns.”