Sun ready to set on solar farm plan?

Solar panels
Solar panels

Campaigners were preparing to celebrate as a major scheme they have protested against looks set to get the chop.

The application to build a solar farm that would be the “size of 15 premier league football pitches’’ in Snodworth Road, Langho, has been recommended for refusal at a meeting of Ribble Valley Council’s planning committee on Thursday.

The reasons given for turning down the application are that it is an inappropriate development in green belt and it was considered the applicant, Mr Andrew Freeth of Bangor based Mulbrick Clean Energy, had not demonstrated sufficient “very special’’ circumstances to warrant approval.

It is also expected to be turned down on the grounds that the increase in the amount of renewable energy that would be generated by the proposal would not outweigh the harm to the character and appearance of the green belt. Another reason given for turning the scheme down was that it would be harmful to the visual amenities and character of the locality due to its size, scale and incongruous appearance.

The application for 17,842 solar panels on the ground covering just over 26 acres at Little Snodworth Farm caused an outcry in the village.

One fierce opponent described the solar farm as an “enormous eyesore.’’

The protestor said: “It will be totally out of keeping in what is a lovely area of the Ribble Valley.

“It is on elevated land and will be seen for miles around and from across the Forest of Bowland having a detrimental and devastating effect on the landscape.’’

Around 80 local residents had complained about the proposal on a range of issues including the proposal would harm the environment and have a detrimental effect on local wildlife.

Neighbours also objected on the grounds that footpaths would have to be diverted unnecessarily and the proposal would not generate enough electricity to warrant spoiling three fields in a green belt area.

They also argued it would look like an open prison with a 2m tall wire fence around the site. Campaigners were preparing to celebrate tonight as a major scheme they have protested against looks set to get the chop.

The application to build a solar farm that would be the “size of 15 premier league football pitches’’ in Snodworth Road, Langho, has been recommended for refusal at a meeting of Ribble Valley Council’s planning committee.

The reasons given for turning down the application are that it is an inappropriate development in green belt and it was considered the applicant, Mr Andrew Freeth of Bangor based Mulbrick Clean Energy, had not demonstrated sufficient “very special’’ circumstances to warrant approval.

It is also expected to be turned down on the grounds that the increase in the amount of renewable energy that would be generated by the proposal would not outweigh the harm to the character and appearance of the green belt. Another reason given for turning the scheme down was that it would be harmful to the visual amenities and character of the locality due to its size, scale and incongruous appearance.

The application for 17,842 solar panels on the ground covering just over 26 acres at Little Snodworth Farm caused an outcry in the village.

One fierce opponent described the solar farm as an “enormous eyesore.’’

The protestor said: “It will be totally out of keeping in what is a lovely area of the Ribble Valley.

“It is on elevated land and will be seen for miles around and from across the Forest of Bowland having a detrimental and devastating effect on the landscape.’’

Around 80 local residents had complained about the proposal on a range of issues including the proposal would harm the environment and have a detrimental effect on local wildlife.

Neighbours also objected on the grounds that footpaths would have to be diverted unnecessarily and the proposal would not generate enough electricity to warrant spoiling three fields in a green belt area.

They also argued it would look like an open prison with a 2m tall wire fence around the site.