50 walk Barrow path re-opened after public inquiry

Veteran campaigner Norman Thorpe nails the way marker to the stile as the public footpath behind The Eagle at Barrow is re-opened.
Veteran campaigner Norman Thorpe nails the way marker to the stile as the public footpath behind The Eagle at Barrow is re-opened.
  • Controversial footpath re-opens after battle
  • Public inquiry finds in favour of ramblers
  • 50 people walk new route in celebration of victory

A celebratory walk by members of Clitheroe Ramblers marked the official re-opening of a controversial right of way.

For the first time in more than seven years, the Ramblers were able to follow the route of the “Whalley 5 footpath” past The Eagle at Barrow and on to cross the railway line beyond.

Veteran campaigner Norman Thorpe leads the ramblers on the newly re-opened public footpath behind The Eagle at Barrow.

Veteran campaigner Norman Thorpe leads the ramblers on the newly re-opened public footpath behind The Eagle at Barrow.

After a long battle to get the closed-off path re-opened, which culminated in a public inquiry last year, being able to walk the route again proved a great occasion.

More than 40 members and friends assembled opposite The Bay Horse in Barrow and walked down to join with others, including our photographer, outside The Eagle, for a celebratory photoshoot.

By the time the party walked the newly opened stretch of path, the group numbered 50.

Once into the field there was a further pause, with more photographs, and with a ceremonial addition of way markers to the new kissing gate.

Veteran campaigner Norman Thorpe leads the ramblers on the newly re-opened public footpath behind The Eagle at Barrow.

Veteran campaigner Norman Thorpe leads the ramblers on the newly re-opened public footpath behind The Eagle at Barrow.

Veteran walker and rights of way campaigner Norman Thorpe – who had represented the Ramblers at the public inquiry which led to the re-opening of the path – gave a brief account of the history of the path and the work involved in its re-opening.

He then led the group on a route across the fields to Brookhouse Farm, then via a field path to Mitton Road and along the route of the Roman road to Barraclough on the Clitheroe/Whalley Road.

A short stretch of road walking towards Clitheroe took the group to a field path eastwards to Four Lane Ends, and then back along Worston Lane to near Clitheroe Golf Club. From here the group followed paths through a short stretch of woodland and then fields back to Barrow.

The total distance of the walk was exactly five miles. Those who, for whatever reason, couldn’t manage the full distance, had opportunities to cut the walk short. In spite of a rather unpromising morning, the afternoon stayed fine and frequently sunny, adding to the enjoyment of the day.

Clitheroe Ramblers organises a wide variety of walks and othere events throughout the year and is a friendly group which welcomes new members. For more information visit: www.clitheroeramblers.co.uk