Battery dead, but not buried

RECYCLING POWER: Coun. Robert Thompson with one of the battery recycling bins.
RECYCLING POWER: Coun. Robert Thompson with one of the battery recycling bins.

RESIDENTS in Ribble Valley are being asked to boost recycling in the borough with battery power.

Batteries power everything from mobile phones and laptops to shavers and toothbrushes. Most end end up in landfill, where they leak harmful chemicals, such as lead, mercury or cadmium, causing soil and water pollution, and risking the health of humans and animals.

But tough new targets mean the UK has to increase battery recycling from the current 2.8% to 25% by the end of 2012 and 45% – a total of 200 million batteries – by 2016.

And Ribble Valley Borough Council has installed a series of battery recycling bins throughout the borough to help tackle the problem.

Coun. Robert Thompson, chairman of the council’s community services committee, said: “Recycling batteries stops them going to landfill and recovers thousands of tonnes of metals, thereby reducing the need to mine new materials and safeguarding the environment.

“But we will have to work together if we are to meet these new targets and I am calling on Ribble Valley residents to do their bit by recycling their old batteries.”

Battery recycling bins are available at the Ribble Valley Borough Council Offices in Church Walk, Clitheroe; Ribble Valley Homes in Station Road, Clitheroe; Ribblesdale Pool in Edisford Road, Clitheroe; and the Old Station Buildings in Berry Lane, Longridge.